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Glossary of Baseball Gloves
Web Identification Guide

Vintage Baseball Glove dating guide
Back to Baseball Glove Dating Guide
Baseball Glove Glossary
The most comprehensive baseball glove Glossary on the internet. complete with pictures, and cross reference links. Links will lead to another section of this page or open in a new window.
Click on the Letter below that the word or term starts with
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A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z
 
Baseball Glove Web Identification Guide
Full Web Full Web The first web using a piece of material sewn directly to the thumb and forefinger. First appearing and commonly used around 1900 -1910  

1 inch web  1 inch Web One, to one and a half inches wide the 1 inch web, like the full web was sewn directly to the thumb and forefinger. First appearing around 1910 and commonly used around 1910 - 1920s  

Grommet Web  Grommet Web - Short and narrow strips of leather that contains grommets (eyelets) sewn to the thumb and forefinger, connected with a single strand of lace that is passed through the grommets, and then tied. First appearing around 1910  

Vertical Tunnel Loop   vertical tunnel loop A loop(s) sewn to both the thumb and forefinger in which lacing is passed through to form a "web" creating a trap. Commonly used around 1920-1930 Goldsmith had it patented in 1923.  

Lacing device   Lace Web Resembling a true web glove manufactures call this a "Lacing Device" It is simply lacing strung from thumb and forefinger through eyelets or vertical tunnels. Mostly used with Baseman's & Catcher's mitts, it was commonly used around 1915-1930s  

Tunnel Web  Single tunnel A strip of leather about one inch wide in which a lace is passed through both top and bottom and connected between the thumb & forefinger either by the use of a vertical tunnel loop or eyelets. Commonly used around the 1930s  

Double Tunnel Web  Double tunnel Two strips of leather about one inch wide in which a lace is passed through both top and bottom and connected between the thumb & forefinger by the use of 8 eyelets (4 on each the thumb & forefinger) Commonly used around the 1930-1940s era  

Triple Tunnel   Triple tunnel Three strips of leather about one inch wide in which a lace is passed through both top and bottom and connected between the thumb & forefinger by the use of 16 eyelets (8 on each the thumb & forefinger) Commonly used around1940-1950  

H Web  H Web Multiple strips of leather laced together to form an H shaped web, Also known as an "I web" First appeared sometime in the late 1930's, early 1940's  

T Web, T Style tunnel Web   T Web - T-Style Tunnel Web. A Tunnel web "thumb trap, panel back" A Tunnel web bridging the thumb & forefinger, with a vertical tunnel connecting the bridge to the crotch. A "T" Shaped Web.  

Trapper Web  Trapper Also known as a trap web. These style webs were for the most part made for Baseman's mitts. The earlier models were made to put your finger inside the web. Trapper webs first stated to appear around the 1940s. and became more popular in the 1950s  

One piece stitched tunnel web  One piece stitched Tunnel Web "Barrel Web" Two large pieces of leather sewn together to form a one large tunnel web. The lace is fed through the tunnels to connect it to the thumb & forefinger. Most are anchored to the crotch Became common throughout the 1950s  

Basket Web  Basket Web A full web that is made of weaved leather laced to the thumb, crotch and forefinger. The Basket web appears around the mid 1960's and becomes more common in the next two decades.  

 

Baseball Glove Glossary A-Z
Crescent Pad Baseball Glove Prewar Split Finger Baseball Glove Baseball Glove Pattern (parts) Front  Baseball Glove Pattern (parts) Back Postwar Laced Fingers Baseball Glove
Crescent Pad
(Heel Ridge)
Split Finger
(Prewar)
Parts of a Glove
(Front)
Parts of a Glove
(Back)
Laced Fingers
(Postwar)
 

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A-Z Quick Jump Navigation

Adjustable Web - A devise used on or as a web such a strap or lace so the web can be fitted to personal requirements. Advertised by glove manufactures as an Adjustable Web, the Buckle Web, bridged between the thumb and forefinger is an example. A Grommet Web is also advertised as such.

Ambidextrous Baseball Glove - A glove that can be worn on either hand, for players that could throw with either the left or right hand. This style baseball glove originated around 1911 and caught on with a few variations over the years.

Andrus & Naedele - A sporting goods company that opened in 1884 and closed around 1925. Andrus & Naedele were agents for Victor baseball goods.

Antique Baseball Glove - A baseball glove or mitt made before 1920 is considered to be Antique in the baseball glove collecting world. Gloves made after, and are at least 25 years of age are Vintage. Most collectors consider gloves made before 1980 to be vintage.

Asbestos Felt - A material commonly used as padding inside some prewar baseball gloves.

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Baseman's Mitt - A baseball Glove resembling a mitten (Mitt) used by players of the first Base position. AKA First base Mitt.

Belknap - A wholesale hardware supply co. established in 1840. Since 1890 their catalog included a line of sporting goods and baseball gloves, that were made by other manufacturers. The company went bankrupt in 1985.

Bill Doak Model - The largest improvement ever in glove design happened in 1920, when Bill Doak, a journeyman pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals, approached Rawlings with an idea for a web laced between the first finger and thumb. Before Doak's invention, gloves were primarily protective equipment that kept fielders' hands and fingers from being hurt by hard hit balls. Doak developed the idea of putting a substantial webbing between the glove's thumb and first finger to form a substantial pre-formed pocket in which to catch the ball. The Rawlings "Bill Doak" model that was first introduced in 1920 was so revolutionary that it remained available until 1953 with only minor modifications. Doak's invention was the ancestor of all modern gloves.

Bridge - The piece of leather or and lacing at the very top of the web connecting the thumb and forefinger.

Buckle Web - Advertised by glove manufactures as an Adjustable Web. The web simply consists of a small strap and buckle, Bridged between the thumb and forefinger.


Buckle Back - Buckled Back. A Glove that features a buckle or strap to secure the wrist on the back.

Button Back
- A Glove that features a button to secure the wrist band on the back.

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Catchers Mitt - A mitten style baseball glove (Mitt) with extra padding to provide protection to the hand from a pitched baseball, and is worn by players at the catchers position.

Closed Back Glove - Features no space between the wrist band and fingers on the back.

Cloth Patch - Manufactures Label, Brand. The cloth patch sewn on the back of the glove.

Crescent Pad - Originally called a "Heel Ridge" a padding technic at the heel of the glove that is formed into a a crescent shaped "hump" to create a pocket to trap the ball. Today collectors refer to it as a Crescent pad. It was also marketed as a "Patent Hump" or "Inside Hump"

Crotch - The area of the glove where the thumb & Forefinger meet, just below the web, and above the pocket.

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D&M - Established in 1840, Draper and Maynard Company became a pioneer in the manufacture of baseball gloves in 1882 when it produced a padded model at the suggestion of a baseball player. In 1900 Draper-Maynard opened a new factory in Plymouth and became a major supplier of baseball equipment for both amateur and professional teams. The business closed in Plymouth in 1937 after the death of John Maynard. That same year, P. Goldsmith Sons Company of Cincinnati, Ohio, purchased the rights to produce sporting goods bearing the Draper-Maynard name and Lucky Dog trademark. Glove Models with the "G" prefix were made at the D&M Plymouth plant, and the "DG" Prefix was made by Goldsmith. Goldsmith stopped manufacturing Draper-Maynard products in 1962 when they merged with MacGregor Sporting Goods.

Deep Well -
A manufactures term for a "Pocket" located in the area of the glove below the webbing or crotch created by the use of padding, lacing and webbing to form a indentation, "well", or Pocket to receive or trap the ball.

Denkert - M. Denkert & Co. a manufacture of leather sporting goods was founded by Mitchell Denkert in 1900. The M. Denkert & Co. was the main supplier of dozens of private labeled brands in addition to the Denkert Brand of baseball gloves. Private labels include: Marathon (Montgomery Ward), Olympic, R.H. Macy Co., JC Higgins (sears) and many others. M. Denkert & Co. closed its business in 1973.


Diamond Brand -
Diamond Manufacturing Co. A line of private branded gloves found in Norvell-Shapleigh Hardware stores catalogs. Diamond Brand gloves were produced by manufacturers such as Wilson or Nokona

Double Tunnel Web -
Two strips of leather about one inch wide in which a lace is passed through both top and bottom and connected between the thumb & forefinger by the use of 8 eyelets (4 on each the thumb & forefinger)

Dubow - The Dubow Glove company was established in 1912 by Jacob Dubow. The company manufactured work gloves and expanded the company in 1918 to include sporting goods. The company name was changed to J.A. Dubow Mfg. The sporting goods division produced quality baseball gloves in the 1920s that drew the endorsements of baseball stars from that era, that included Kiki Cuyler, Johnny Mostil and a Guy Bush glove that featured a sliding strap connecting three fingers. Dubow also manufactured gloves under the Marathon brand sold in Montgomery Wards mail order catalogs. Dubow stopped making gloves by 1960.

Duck Web Fingers - "Duk-Fut" A Baseball glove design featuring webbed fingers, resembling a ducks foot. These gloves appear on the market around the 1911-1920's era.

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Eyelet - Also called a Grommet, a ring made of metal or plastic used to strengthen holes punched into the leather used for lacing purposes. This prevents the leather from ripping.

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Franklin - A sporting goods company founded by Sydney, and Irving H. Franklin and was established in 1946. In 1962 Franklin began to import baseball gloves from Japan.

Fielders Glove - A baseball glove designed for use by infielders, outfielders and pitchers. Fielders gloves can be specialized to a specific fielding position other than Cather, and first baseman, positions that use mitts.

Finger Loop
- Pinky Loop, Thumb Loop. A leather loop with one side sewn into the inside of the glove to insert fingers into. the other side is laced through the back of the glove so it can be adjusted. Finger loops are also used on the outside of the glove, on one or both the index, and middle fingers, like this Nokona patented Fingerlok.

Finger Slot - A baseball glove feature patented around 1971 whereas a slot or hole, in the back of the glove below the forefinger of the glove, can be used to slip your forefinger through to the outside of the glove. AKA Rawlings "Holdster"

First Baseman's Mitt - Baseman's Mitt, A baseball Glove resembling a mitten (Mitt) used by players of the first Base position.

Folsom - Folsom Arms was a retailer and distributor of firearms and sporting goods back in the late 1800's. They branched out into Athletic equipment in the 1890's through an agreement with A.G. Spalding, who manufatured the gloves with the Folsom brand. Denkert made gloves for Folsom in the later years. Folsom arms closed shop sometime around the 1950's.

Forefinger - The Index finger. The finger next to the thumb

Full Rights - Rights, Left Handers Glove, Lefty Glove. A manufactures term for a glove worn on the right hand for left handed throwing players. "Gloves are made in Rights & Lefts. Lefts are regular and are used on the left hand by players who throw with their Right hand. Rights are called "Full Rights" and are used by players that throw with their Left Hand" -1921 Reach catalog. Left handed store model gloves are more rare than right handed gloves. Only 1 in 12 gloves sold were for left handed throwers.

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Gamer - A term used by collectors to describe a game used piece of equipment such as a Bat or Baseball glove.

Game Used
- A piece of equipment that has been used by a professional ball player during a game such as a baseball bat or glove. For example a glove used by a professional baseball player like Mickey Mantle is "Game Used" A baseball glove that was used in a little league game is a used glove not a "Game used" glove.

Glove Hang Tag
- A Hang tag that was used to price and/or describe the features of the glove. A glove Tag will add a premium to the value of the glove. Prewar Tags could add about $50.  Photo Tags $50.-$200. depending on the player demand. Postwar Tags add about $25. Photo Tags $25.-$100.depending on the player demand.

Goldsmith -
P. Goldsmith's Sons Co. a Cincinnati sporting goods & baseball glove manufacturer, founded by Philip Goldsmith. After a short partnership with Wolf Fletcher in 1875, making baseballs, the company was known as P.Goldsmith & Co. by 1890. In 1906 the name was changed to P. Goldsmith's Sons Co. Goldsmith bought out two struggling sporting goods companies in 1936 & 1937. Draper Maynard and Crawford, McGregor & Canby Co. which became MacGregor Golf Co. Around 1944 Goldsmith added the MacGregor name to their products and became known as "MacGregor Goldsmith" Finally, in 1952 the Goldsmith name was dropped entirely and the company was simply called MacGregor. MacGregor Goldsmith 1944-1952 Glove label

Goldsmith's Inc.
of Wichita, Kansas, was established in 1887. A Book & stationary store that carried a full line of books, stationery, confectionery, cigars, tobacco and gent’s furnishing goods. In 1900, they expanded their inventory to sporting goods, which included a line of baseball bats and gloves, that carried the Goldsmith's Wichita brand name. In 1965, Goldsmith’s sold its sporting goods business, and on June 10, 2003, Goldsmith’s declared bankruptcy, selling its assets to the John Marshall Company.

Grommet
- Also called Eyelet, a ring made of metal or plastic used to strengthen holes punched into the leather used for lacing purposes. This prevents the leather from ripping.

Grommet Back - A glove that has lace passed through grommets (eyelets) to secure the wrist on the back.

Grommet Web - Short and narrow strips of leather that contains grommets (eyelets) sewn to the thumb and forefinger, connected with a single strand of lace that is passed through the grommets, and then tied.

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H Web -Multiple strips of leather laced together to form an H shaped web, Also known as an "I web"

Hang Tag - A Glove Tag that was used to price and/or describe the features of the glove. A glove Tag will add a premium to the value of the glove. Prewar Tags could add about $50.  Photo Tags $50.-$200. depending on the player demand. Postwar Tags add about $25. Photo Tags $25.-$100.depending on the player demand.

Hawthorne - A Sporting Goods Brand sold at Montgomery Ward Department stores & mail order catalog.

Heel Ridge - Extra padding at the heel of the glove that is formed into a a crescent shaped "hump" to create a pocket to trap the ball. AKA Crescent pad to collectors it was also marketed as a "Patent Hump" or "Inside Hump"

Hinged Pad - Hinge. A space in the padding of the glove located at the heel of the palm that provides more flexibility. It allows the glove to be opened and closed easily.

HOH - Short for Rawlings "Heart Of The Hide" baseball gloves which features top of the line HOH shell leather, deer tanned cow hide palm and finger back linings. Heart Of The Hide gloves are highly desired among glove collectors.

Holdster - A baseball glove feature introduced by Rawlings around 1968 whereas a finger slot or hole, in the back of the glove, below the forefinger of the glove, can be used to slip your forefinger through to the outside of the glove. AKA Rawlings "Holdster"

Hole in the Palm Glove - Acting on a known custom, of infielders cutting out the padding in their gloves to get a better grip on the ball, W.T. Stall of Stall & Dean took out a patent in 1906 for a glove with a hole in the palm.

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Infielders' glove - Typically a smaller glove with shallow pockets to allow the infielder to remove the ball quickly in order to make a throw to a base. Most infielders' use Open Webs to allow scooped up dirt to escape before making a throw.

I Web - Another name for the H Web. Multiple strips of leather laced together to form an "H" shaped web or an "I" depending on how you look at it.

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J.A. Peach Co. - A sporting goods company founded by John A. Peach around 1900, in Gloversville, NY. J.A. Peach was granted a patent in 1905 for the "The Peach" inner pocket Base Ball glove that had adjustable padding to "suit your hand"

JC Higgins - From 1908 until 1961 Sears, Roebuck & Company sold a wide variety of sporting goods, under the brand name "J. C. Higgins." John Higgins was the manager of the headquarters' office bookkeepers. John Higgins consented to Sears use of his name for a new line of sporting goods. Since he did not have a middle initial, Sears added the "C." In 1908, the Western Sporting Goods Company (Wilson) began putting J.C. Higgins on baseballs and baseball gloves sold in Sears catalogs. The J.C. Higgins brand disappeared shortly after Sears introduced the Ted Williams brand of sporting and recreation goods in 1961. Sears switched their glove making contract over to MacGregor and they made most of the Ted Williams gloves

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Ken Wel - A Sporting Goods company established in Gloversville, NY around 1914 and relocated to New Hartford and Utica, NY. Ken-Wel's innovative baseball glove designs included the 1925 patent Dazzy Vance model that had double laced fingers, and the Lou Gehrig Zipper Back Baseman's Mitt.

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L-Heel - Lacing up the little finger (pinky) that forms an "L" shaped laced heel.

 

Lacing - A strand of rawhide used to assemble, join, fasten, or hold the leather parts of a baseball glove together, where nylon thread stitching is not needed. Mostly fed through grommets it is used to build a web, join the fingers together, secure the padding, adjust the wrist strap and the parameter of the glove.

Lacing Device - A term coined by manufactures for a web using nothing but lace, mostly used with Baseman's & Catcher's mitts,

Left Handed Glove - Lefty Glove. Gloves worn on the right hand for left handed throwing players. Left handed store model gloves are more rare than right handed gloves. Only 1 in 12 gloves sold were for left handed throwers.

Lining - The inner side of the Glove. Sometimes a different leather or material is used other than the outer shell of the glove. Asbestos, cowhide, horsehide, sheepskin, suede, wool, etc....The lining can be ruined from heavy use caused by sweat, and in time become hard & crack.

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Marathon - A brand of a line of Sporting Goods sold in the Montgomery Ward mail order catalog

MacGregor
- Originally the Crawford, McGregor & Canby Co. and then MacGregor Golf Co. P.Goldsmith & sons purchased the company in 1936 in an effort to expand their product line and market share. Around 1944 Goldsmith added the MacGregor name to their products and became known as "MacGregor Goldsmith" an attempt to trade on the prestigious image the MacGregor company had earned. Finally, in 1952 the Goldsmith name was dropped entirely and the company was simply called MacGregor. MacGregor Goldsmith 1944-1952 Glove label MacGregor becomes a division of the Brunswick Corparation by 1961 and in 1967 the Brunswick Corporation buys MacGregor. The Brunswick logo appears above MacGregor throughout the '60's.

Mitt
- Short for Mitten, a baseball glove that resembles a Mitten or lacking fingers. Typically used by Catchers, and first baseman. Baseman's Mitt.

Model
- A series of numbers or and letters designated by the manufacturer, used to identify a specific glove in a wholesale catalog for resale and retail.

Modern Day Baseball Glove - A Baseball glove made in the last 25 years. Most collectors consider gloves made after 1980 to be Modern. Before 1980, Vintage, and before 1920 Antique.

Montgomery Ward - A mail order and department store retailer, that operated between 1872 and 2000. Montgomery Ward Carried a Small line of sporting goods through the years that included a the private labeled Marathon Brand, Hawthorne, & (Wards/Hawthorne), as well as a Montgomery Ward brand that included gloves imported from Korea. They also had a line  Stan Musial Baseball gloves.

MW - A Montgomery Ward Department Store (MW Sporting Goods) Logo on a baseball glove.

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Nokona - A manufacture of leather athletic goods, and baseball gloves. Established in 1926 Nokona produced their first baseball glove in 1934. Based in Texas the "All American" Nokona logo features native American Indian Chief Peta Nocona.

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Oil Treated - Oil Tanned. A term used by manufactures for the preservation of leather gloves or and create a very soft, pliable finish. "Oiled" Glove Oil is used for "Oiling the glove" to make it more pliable when breaking in a glove.

Olympic - A brand sold by the Olympic Sporting Goods Company, a small New York based company that operated from the 1920's until the 1960's. The Olympic glove brand was also made for and sold in Western Auto Stores. Many of the gloves they sold were actually produced by Denkert, then stamped with the Olympic brand name.

Open Back Glove - Features a space above the wrist adjustment on the back of the glove.

Open Web - A web style typically used by infielders to allow scooped up dirt to escape before making a throw. Open Web

Outfielder's Glove - Long deep pocket gloves to help with catching fly balls on the run. Typically measure about 12" to 12 3/4 inches from wrist to the tip.

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Pad or Padding - Sewn or laced into the heel of the glove to form a pocket or soften the impact of a baseball. Thumb & finger padding. Stuffing used as padding includes: cotton, hair felt  asbestos felt, wool felt, jute felt or 2- 5 layers of leather stitched together.

Pattern - The design of a glove. The features and size of a glove combine to form a glove's "pattern," which creates a glove specially designed for a position and a player. For example: an Outfielders Glove has a "Large Pattern"

Pennant - A brand of sporting goods sold in the Butler Brothers general merchandise mail order catalog which opened in 1877. Baseball glove manufacturers such as Thomas E. Wilson Co. made the gloves with the Pennant brand label. Rawlings might have produced gloves with the Pennant brand in later years

Pinky Loop - Finger Loop. A leather loop with one side sewn into the inside of the glove to insert the pinky finger into. the other side is laced through the back of the glove so it can be adjusted. 


Piping - A term used with baseball gloves describing the tubular seam sewn into the edge or border of the leather on a baseball glove. Binding. Commonly found on the edges of the wrist strap on the back. Most piping is made of leather or cloth, vinyl, and plastic on cheaper gloves. Piping shown here in black

Pita Pocket Glove - An odd shaped pocket resembling a large Pita bread with glove like finger sections on the back. Circa 1900.

Pitchers' Glove - Typically have a closed, opaque webbing to allow the pitcher to conceal their grip on the ball from the batter.

Pocket - Is the area of the glove below the webbing or crotch created by the use of padding, lacing and webbing to form a indentation, well, or "Pocket" to receive or trap the ball.

Postwar Glove -Baseball Gloves & Mitts made after the mid 1940s, 1945 after WWII, Prewar Gloves being Made before. Glove with laces that join the fingers together are considered to be postwar. (with the exception of a few rare examples)

Prewar Glove - Baseball Gloves & Mitts made before the mid 1940s or before The United States entered WWII, approximately 1941 - 1945 Postwar Gloves being Made after. Gloves without lacing joing the fingers (split finger) are considered to be Prewar.

Provenance - The history of ownership of a particular item such as a Game Used baseball glove. It allows the buyer to secure additional insight as to the origin or chain of custody of the item.

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Quick Release Buckle - An arrow head wrist strap devise designed to be removed quickly

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Rawlings - A sports equipment manufacturing company founded in 1887. A Pioneer in the baseball glove industry Rawlings introduced innovative designs that included the Bill Doak Model (1919), Deep Well Pocket (1930), Trapper (1940), and V-Anchored Web (1950)

Reach - The A.J. Reach sporting goods company was formed by former player and founder of the Philadelphia Phillies franchise in 1874. The company was then sold to Spalding in 1889. Reach sporting goods was one of the first Manufacturers of Baseball gloves.

RH - A designation on a glove box indicating a glove that is worn on the Right Hand for left handed throwing players.

Right Handed Glove - "Righty Glove". Gloves worn on the left hand for right handed throwing players. right handed store model gloves are more common than left handed gloves. Only 1 in 12 gloves sold were for left handed throwers.

Rolled Lace - Also known as "Spiral Wound" a braided or coiled lacing used to form a sturdy web bridge.

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Sewn Web - A web sewn between the thumb and forefinger

Signature Model - A glove that carries the facsimile signature of a player that endorsed the glove. A players name in block letters followed by "Style" "Type" or Model" are non endorsed gloves, and are not Signature Models. Before the 1920s very few gloves had endorsements or player Signatures.

Simmons American Sporting Goods - Founded by Edward Simmons in 1859. The company had a Mail order catalog, and retail outlets in St. Louis MO. They became the largest hardware store in the world by 1910. Their 1912 mail order catalog included a line of sporting goods, that featured a Simmons American branded  "Duck Web" baseball glove. in 1940, Simmons declared bankruptcy and was bought out by rival hardware supplier, Shapleigh's of St. Louis. Simmons American Branded gloves were manufactured by companies such as Spalding, Wilson and Rawlings.

Snare Web - Introduced around 1936 on Goldsmith fielders gloves "The Snare" Web has an exclamation mark shaped piece of leather laced to the thumb, forefinger, & crotch. The Snare also shows up in 1947 on Baseman's mitts made by MacGregor Goldsmith.

Sonnett - A manufacture of Baseball gloves, OK MFG Co. and Sonnett Sporting Goods was founded by William Sonnett who began his work in the baseball glove department at the P. Goldsmith Sons company and became the general superintendent, where he came up with some ideas that changed the future of sports equipment. In 1933, Sonnett started the Ohio-Kentucky MFG Co. The WWII years the company produced sporting goods for servicemen as well as "barbed wire gauntlets" so that troops could maneuver into enemy territory. Post war 1940's the name Sonnett started to take precedence, and the brand name shifts from O.K. MFG Co. to Sonnett. 1954, Wilson Sporting Goods purchased the company but the name Sonnett is still labeled on the gloves.

Spalding -  A sporting goods company founded in 1876 by Albert Spalding, a pitcher and the manager of the Chicago White Stockings. The adoption of the baseball glove by baseball star Albert Spalding when he began playing first base influenced more infielders to begin using gloves at a tome when players did not wear them. By the mid 1890s, it was the norm for players to wear gloves in the field.

Split Finger The absence of lacing to join the fingers together

Stall & Dean - The Stall & Dean Manufacturing Co. in Brockton, Mass. was founded by W.T. Stall and C.H. Dean in 1898. Their product of sporting goods included; Base Ball Suits, Gloves, Mitts, Balls and Bats. The Stall and Dean Company is one of the oldest sporting goods manufacturers in America.

Stan The Man inc. - Based in st. Louis Missouri Stan The Man Inc. was a company that Stan Musial was involved with after his playing career. The company sold Stan Musial memorabilia that included "Stan the Man Inc." branded Baseball Bats and gloves. It is unknown who manufactured the Stan the Man Inc. branded baseball gloves, but they were imported from Japan. The company was operated by Dick Zitzmann, vice president of Stan the Man Inc. and current president of Sport Classics Inc, when it closed its doors in 2015.

Store Model - Store Bought. A retail baseball glove manufactured to be sold in stores. Not professional game issued or game used.

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Thumb Loop - Finger Loop. A leather loop with one side sewn into the inside of the glove to insert the thumb into. the other side is laced through the back of the glove so it can be adjusted. 

Tornado Palm -
A baseball glove feature with a stitched swirl, "tornado" like pattern on the palm of the glove, designed to add extra grip to the ball.

TRAP-EZE Web -
A trapper style "T" shaped web design patented by Rawlings.

Trapper Web - Also known as a trap web or snare. These style webs were for the most part made for Baseman's mitts. The earlier models were made to put your finger inside the web

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U-Opening - Palm Crotch extension. A "'U" Shaped thumb forming Crotch on a catchers Mitt designed to eliminate Grommets and lacing to open into a Ball receiving pocket. The Patent for this design was applied for in 1946, by Rawlings', Harry B. Latina.  The Deep Well Laced Pocket" hit the market in 1948, patent pending.

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V-Back - The open area of the back of the glove that is shaped like a V (upside down) usually secured with a wrist strap.

Vertical tunnel loop - A loop(s) sewn to both the thumb and forefinger in which lacing is passed through to form a "web" creating a trap. Commonly used around 1920-1930 Goldsmith had it patented in 1923.

Victor - A Sporting Goods Company established in 1898. In 1918, the Victor Sporting Goods Company consolidated with the Wright & Ditson Company. The W
right & Ditson company was founded in 1871 and was bought by Spalding in 1891.
Victor Sporting Goods Logo
Wright & Ditson - Victor Co. glove Label

Vintage Baseball Glove - A term usually intended to indicate that a baseball glove was manufactured and sold quite some time ago. Aged or of older origin. For example: a vintage 1956 Stan Musial baseball glove as opposed to a modern day 2006 Albert Pujols baseball glove. A baseball glove manufactured about 25 or more years ago. Most collectors consider glove made before 1980 to be vintage. Glove made before 1920 are antique.

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W.A. Holt Company Inc. - Athletic Outfitters that was located in Waco Houston, TX. Holt was a sporting goods retailer that sold gloves made by other well-known baseball glove manufacturers that included Rawlings, Goldsmith, Reach and Stall & Dean, then labeled with the Holt brand and logo. Some of the highly collectible models they sold included their own versions of the early Rawlings Bill Doak gloves and the Reach Babe Ruth Home Run Special.

Web Spiral - A lacing technic used on the Bridge of the web.


W
elted Seam- Welting, A
strong functional seam to withstand wear and tear to the glove. It also provides a decorative finish.

Wilson - A sporting goods company originally named the Thomas E. Wilson Co. in 1916. Incorporated in 1913, the company was originally established to find unique ways of using slaughterhouse byproducts of a nearby meat-packing firm. The Thomas E. Wilson company began the manufacturing of baseball Gloves in the 1920s. In 1931, the name was changed to Wilson Sporting Goods Co.

Workman's Glove - A baseball glove resembling a work glove. The earliest of gloves used by ballplayers in the late 1870’s to early 1880’s they were actual workman's or utility gloves taken off the farm or work site for use on the ball field. Wearing two gloves, it became a common practice to cut the fingers off the one on their throwing hand to get a better grip on the ball. Sporting goods manufacturers capitalized on this idea and started to copy the design of the utility gloves, for sale in their stores. Drapper and Maynard was one of the first to produce "Workman Style" Base Ball Gloves.

Worth Inc. - Founded by George Sharp Lannom Jr. in 1912 as Lannom Manufacturing Company. A producer of leather horse collars and harnesses, Lannom developed a sporting goods line in order to utilize his tannery. Expanding the business in 1921 they added helmets, basketballs, baseballs and later softballs. Naming the line "Worth," Lannom created the slogan "Another Name for Value"

Wright & Ditson - Founded in 1871 by Baseball Hall of Famer George Wright and Boston businessman Henry Ditson. The company specialized in tennis rackets, and golf clubs and by the turn of the 19th century, baseball equipment. By the early 1900's, A.G. Spalding & Brothers controlled 99.7% of the company's shares. In 1910, Wright & Ditson announced the formation of a partnership with Victor Sporting Goods of Springfield, Massachusetts. Victor's baseball factory would produce their specialties, namely baseballs, bats, mitts, and gloves, for Wright & Ditson, and the goods would thereafter bear the Wright & Ditson logo. In 1918, the Victor Sporting Goods Company consolidated with the Wright & Ditson Company. All sporting goods produced from their facilities thereafter were stamped with a new Victor, Wright & Ditson logo. In 1928, Spalding consolidated Reach and the Wright & Ditson-Victor Co. into A.J. Reach, Wright & Ditson, Inc.

Wrist Strap - A feature on the back of a baseball glove or mitt designed to secure the glove to the wrist. Various designs through the years include the Buckle Back, Button Back, and wrist straps secured with lace.

Wrap Around Zipper - A zipper added to the perimeter of a catchers mitt so padding can be added, removed or adjusted.

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XAC - A baseball glove brand that produced gloves some time around the 1910's to 1930s era. Little is known about this company or where they were located.

X
-Laced Web - A lacing device built into the web, using rawhide lace to form an X, claimed by manufactures to help grip the baseball. Double & Triple X webs.

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Yale - A brand of Baseball Bats, and gloves made by the Moneco Company of Hamden (New Haven) Conn. This line of sporting goods dates back to the 1910's -1920's era. A 1950's line of gloves include Mays & Goodman (Block letters, non endorsed) models

Youth Glove
- A smaller sized baseball glove designed to fit a child or adolescent teens hand.

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Zipper Back - A devise used on the back of mitts to secure the glove to the hand in place of a wrist strap. Ken Wel Zipper Back

Zipper Heel - A devise (zipper) used on the under heel of the glove to be able to add, remove or make adjustments to the padding.

 


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